By Tamryn Spruill TRIGGER WARNING: This article discusses rape, sexual assault, complicity, silence, and other forms of violence in frank and unflinching terms. In the hit Netflix series Beef, Amy Lau (Ali Wong) and Danny Cho (Steven Yeun) are fed up with their respective personal and professional frustrations, which teeter into violence during a road-rage incident between them. Refreshing for its centering of the Korean-American community of Los Angeles, and debuting just months after Asian actors and filmmakers had a historic run at the 2023 Oscars, Beef was on track for unparalleled success — but not just on the strength of its diversity both in front of and behind the camera. Beef stood on the merits of its masterful, artful storytelling. But after four episodes, I’m out — resigned to never witness the evolution of Amy’s and Danny’s respective and shared crises — because the violence of Beef leaped from my television screen, penetrated my psyche, and infused it with swirling...